The Board of Directors is broken up into specific leadership teams or task forces that lead the different projects and take care of the organization’s day to day functioning. Currently, we have the following ongoing Task Forces and Projects:

Executive Core (Juan Pablo, Stephanie, Cara): Officers on the Executive Core are voted on a yearly basis from the sitting Board of Directors, and are in charge of organizing monthly meetings, helping coordinate the different project group leaders, and provide support where needed. They are also in charge of administrative tasks such as finances, taxes, reports, website maintenance, and social media.

Mentoring Future Scientists Phase II (Dilara, Jamie): This group is currently revising the guidelines developed and established in Phase I of the project, and will work on dissemination and data collection based on their implementation. 

International Scholars (Harinder, Sri, Christian, Adriana): This group is focusing on surveying, identifying, analyzing, and reporting on the unique challenges faced by international scholar (PhD students, postdocs, research staff, faculty) in the U.S. 

Policy Task Force (Nicole, Adriana, Emma, Stephen): Officers on the Policy Task Force stay up to date on governmental and institutional (NIH, NSF) policies that arise and affect ECRs. In real time, they draft statements and respond to RFIs or other policy issues that arise related to ECRs. They also coordinate with other project leads where necessary and appropriate.

Academic Anti-Racism (Kaliris, Chloe, JP): This nascent group will be focused on coordinating, organizing, and collecting data to inform practices and build a collective vision of equity and inclusion in STEM training environments.

Labor Task Force (Emily, Amanda, Liz): This nascent group will focus on institutional and departmental policies that affect the labor of ECRs. Specifically they are currently surveying and collecting data on unionizing for both postdocs and graduate students, and are also collecting data on postdoctoral scholars who lose their benefits by accepting national training awards, and which institutions have found ways around this.

Graphic Design (Carrie): Carrie coordinates with other BoD groups and leadership to design and illustrate infographics, figures, flyers, website, etc. She also leads volunteers who are interested in doing this work.

Volunteer Opportunities.

If you are interested in volunteering for any of the above projects, please fill out the brief survey and let us know.

Mentoring Task Force

A supportive training environment is a key determinant of early career researchers’ health, well-being, and success. However, training policies vary between institutions, and even differ between labs within the same institution, making it hard for trainees to identify the right environment. The Mentoring Future Scientists task force strives to develop policy guidelines that foster healthy, sustainable environments in higher education. We also maintain a publicly accessible, crowdsourced database that contains the mentoring policies of individual departments to empower trainees to select the department that best suits their needs.

Policy Task force

Policy makers hold great power: with just the stroke of a pen, they can improve the living and working conditions of early career researchers, or make it even harder to succeed. To ensure that the needs and concerns of ECRs are met and addressed, it is important for trainees at every level to stay up to date on upcoming policy changes and to engage with the people who write these policies. The policy task force scans impending policies for those that  impact the ECR community, and responds to them when needed. We also teach ECRs how to bring about positive change, and empower ECRs to take political action.

Labor Task Force

o achieve fair and equitable working conditions, academic workers at every level are unionizing at rapidly increasing rates all across America. However, unionization efforts face many unique hurdles. For example, graduate students and postdocs continue to be labeled as trainees, but should be legally recognized as workers by their universities. In addition, institutional administrations lack transparency on many levels, such as compensation and benefits, and there is a growing shift to temporary positions within higher ed. To support unionization of early career academic workers, the Labor Task Force creates and distributes resources meant to bolster the efforts of established and campaigning unions. We write blog posts to debunk common union busting myths and to provide examples of successful strategies to organize. We have also compiled information about the state of academic work environments across the US.

Mentoring Task Force

A supportive training environment is a key determinant of early career researchers’ health, well-being, and success. However, training policies vary between institutions, and even differ between labs within the same institution, making it hard for trainees to identify the right environment. The Mentoring Future Scientists task force strives to develop policy guidelines that foster healthy, sustainable environments in higher education. We also maintain a publicly accessible, crowdsourced database that contains the mentoring policies of individual departments to empower trainees to select the department that best suits their needs.

Policy Task force

Policy makers hold great power: with just the stroke of a pen, they can improve the living and working conditions of early career researchers, or make it even harder to succeed. To ensure that the needs and concerns of ECRs are met and addressed, it is important for trainees at every level to stay up to date on upcoming policy changes and to engage with the people who write these policies. The policy task force scans impending policies for those that  impact the ECR community, and responds to them when needed. We also teach ECRs how to bring about positive change, and empower ECRs to take political action.

Labor Task Force

o achieve fair and equitable working conditions, academic workers at every level are unionizing at rapidly increasing rates all across America. However, unionization efforts face many unique hurdles. For example, graduate students and postdocs continue to be labeled as trainees, but should be legally recognized as workers by their universities. In addition, institutional administrations lack transparency on many levels, such as compensation and benefits, and there is a growing shift to temporary positions within higher ed. To support unionization of early career academic workers, the Labor Task Force creates and distributes resources meant to bolster the efforts of established and campaigning unions. We write blog posts to debunk common union busting myths and to provide examples of successful strategies to organize. We have also compiled information about the state of academic work environments across the US.