#ECRPeerReview: Which journals recognize co-reviewers? The TRANSPOSE project

#ECRPeerReview: Which journals recognize co-reviewers? The TRANSPOSE project

  Reminder: our survey on attitudes and experiences in peer review is open until September 21st – please fill it in and urge your peers to do so too! https://tinyurl.com/ECRs-in-peer-review     As part of our effort to increase transparency about the role of early career researchers in peer review, we are trying to collect data on the policies that journals have implemented with respect to involvement of early career researchers. Particularly we are looking at how transparent co-reviewer policies are, and whether expectations around co-reviewing are made clear.   We are part of a collaborative project, TRANsparency in Scholarly Publishing for Open Scholarship Evolution or TRANSPOSE, to work on gathering this and other data about scholarly publishing. This project has been accepted as part of the Scholarly Communication Institute 2018 Meeting in Chapel Hill, NC, where the theme is “Overcoming Risk“. One of the risks identified in our project is the risk ECRs face when it comes to ensuring their scholarly contribution is recognized.   What is TRANSPOSE? TRANSPOSE (TRANsparency in Scholarly Publishing for Open Scholarship Evolution) is a grassroots project to crowdsource journal policies on peer review and preprints. The project is a collaborative effort across a number of different organizations dedicated to making publishing more transparent. Future of Research is particularly interested in the component you can search below – which journals allow co-reviewers to be named!   Why TRANSPOSE? Journal policies on peer review and preprints are variable and complex. Existing databases (such as SHERPA/RoMEO and Publons) contain some, but not all, of this information.     How can I help?   If you’d like to...
Contact your Senators to request they ask the NIH Director why the NIH continues to give grants to scientists found guilty of sexual harassment

Contact your Senators to request they ask the NIH Director why the NIH continues to give grants to scientists found guilty of sexual harassment

On Thursday, August 23, at 10 AM EDT the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) will hold a hearing entitled “Prioritizing Cures: Science and Stewardship at the National Institutes of Health”. The hearing will be webcast here. Last week Senate HELP Ranking Member Patty Murray sent a letter to Dr. Francis Collins, who will be testifying at the meeting, posing a number of questions about how NIH handles sexual harassment among funded investigators. They draw attention to the NIH’s role in this problem, ask for evidence of the NIH’s actions to date, and request policy change. Francis Collins, Hannah Valentine and Michael Lauer wrote a letter to Nature in 2016 about the need for policy changes.   We are asking you to join those who have a started a campaign to contact elected representatives on the HELP Committee. A graduate student at Yale, Sarah Smaga, has produced a call script for the HELP Committee Meeting including the names and telephone numbers of Senators on the committee which you can access here. The call asks for specific policies to ensure that those found guilty of sexual harassment are not able to receive NIH funding, enabling them to put more trainees and their careers at risk.   Two members of the committee are particularly focused on prospects of early career researchers: Susan Collins of Maine and Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin led a bipartisan effort focused on trainees that resulted in the Next Generation Researchers Initiative at NIH being mandated under the 21st Century Cures Act. It seeks to improve prospects for early career researchers, paying attention to recommendations from a study at the...
Welcome to our new members of the Board of Directors!

Welcome to our new members of the Board of Directors!

We are excited to announce the return of Board members Dr. Jessica Polka, Dr. David Riglar, Dr. Cara Weismann and Dr. Carrie Niziolek to serve another term on the Board of Directors, in addition to our six new members!   We would like to thank Dr. Kearney Gunsalus, Dr. Yelena Bernadskaya, Dr. Erica Walsh-Michel, Dr. Sarah Mazzilli and Dr. Patricia Goodwin for their service on the board since its creation.   Our new Board members, who are taking their places, are:            ...
Puerto Rico Institute of Statistics wins reprieve in government reorganization bill

Puerto Rico Institute of Statistics wins reprieve in government reorganization bill

Future of Research recently joined a number of other U.S. and international scientific organizations and professional societies in sending a letter to Puerto Rico Governor Ricardo Rosselló, urging him to keep the Puerto Rico Institute of Statistics (PRIS) autonomous and independent. There has been good news: the component of a government reorganization bill dismantling PRIS was removed in final conference deliberations hours before the midnight deadline of June 30 ending the legislative session. There were frequent references to 47 scientific organizations urging Puerto Rico’s governor not to dismantle statistical agency and we are very glad to have been able to add our support to this cause. Join us on social media to thank the Puerto Rico legislature and especially Senate President Thomas Rivera Schatz (@trschatz51) and House Speaker Carlos ‘Johnny’ Méndez Núñez (@JohnnyMndez36) along with the conference committee using the hashtags: #FactsMatterPR & #CuentasClarasPR. You can also read news items about the development from the Royal Statistical Society and the American Statistical Association. We received the following from the coordinators of the effort: “We were pleasantly surprised by the development with each new version of the reorganizational plan remaining fixed on dismantling PRIS and the final House and Senate passed versions earlier in the week both containing the provision. Despite the seemingly slim chance for success, the broad community fighting for PRIS’s independence kept up the pressure through media, social media, and grassroots…The conferenced and approved bill has this language (translated by Google Translate): “However, it is clarified that this Legislature has determined to address issues related to the Institute of Statistics in a subsequent legislation.” Please stay tuned.” Many thanks to all who...
Call for applications to serve on Future of Research’s Board of Directors 2018-20: Applications Close July 10th

Call for applications to serve on Future of Research’s Board of Directors 2018-20: Applications Close July 10th

*We have extended applications to July 12th*   Future of Research is looking to recruit new members to serve on our Board of Directors from 2018-2020.   Members of the Board serve for two years. We are looking for people interested in taking a lead on small projects, or in working groups, to support the work of the organization and help us in our goal of helping junior researchers organize local meetings; increasing transparency about the academic system; and generally advocating for change for junior researchers.   In particular, this year we are gearing up to focus on: empowerment of early career researchers, through recognition of their scholarly efforts in peer review, and to advocate for more ECRs on the boards of organizations in the research community; incentivizing and rewarding good mentoring, and calling out egregious behavior and sexual harassment in academe; and fundraising efforts to help sustain the work of the organization going forward. Applications from anyone able to commit to work on these projects will be particularly favorably viewed.   The time commitment expected is 1-2 hours per week, usually working over video calls. We would be happy to receive applications from anyone interested in helping us, regardless of field, career stage or location.   Please spread the word! To apply, fill out the form here and send a brief CV to info@futureofresearch.org – feel free to contact us for more information! The applications are open until July 10th....
National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine report on sexual harassment in academia to be released June 12th

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine report on sexual harassment in academia to be released June 12th

  From the National Academies site:   “The study scope will include the following:  Review of the research on the extent to which women in the fields of science, engineering, and medicine are victimized by sexual harassment on college and university campuses, in research labs and field sites; at hospitals/medical centers; and in other academic environments; Examination of existing information on the extent to which sexual harassment in academia negatively impacts the recruitment, retention, and advancement of women pursuing scientific, engineering, technical, and medical careers, with comparative evidence drawn from other sectors, such as the military, government, and the private sector. Identification and analysis of policies, strategies and practices that have been the most successful in preventing and addressing sexual harassment in these settings. For purposes of this study, the definition of sexual harassment includes unwanted sexual advances and requests for sexual favors and other unwelcome conduct that is sexual in nature, as well as those situations in which the work or study environment is made intimidating or offensive as a result of actions that are gender-based and that interfere with an individual’s academic or work performance, opportunities for advancement, and morale.   Report Release Event Public Report Release Event June 12, 2018, 11 am – 12:30 pm ET Washington, DC To attend in person or via webcast: Webcast will be made live on this page on Tuesday, June 12, 2018 at 11:00 AM ET. How can academic institutions improve in the #MeToo era? Join the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine on Tuesday June 12, 2018, 11 am – 12:30 pm ET, for the public release of...